No clean water for beer Here are climate change risks keeping Canadian

first_img Molson Coors Brewing Co. worries that competition could heat up over scarce supplies of clean water.Postmedia Email Sponsored By: January 25, 201911:36 AM ESTLast UpdatedJanuary 25, 201911:42 AM EST Filed under News FP Street Twitter Quebecor Inc. executives considering worst-case scenarios that could befall their business as a result of climate change suggest buried internet infrastructure could be at risk from rising sea levels.At Molson Coors Brewing Co., meanwhile, management is thinking about how they’ll make enough beer to meet consumer demand if competition heats up over scarce supplies of clean water.Those are among the concerns raised by more than 6,000 companies in submissions to CDP, a London-based global non-profit organization that gathers information from companies and ranks them on the comprehensiveness of their disclosure, awareness and management of environmental risks.CDP said many of the firms made their submission at the request of investors seeking information to help them make decisions and manage their own risks. The CDP study comes as regulators in Canada, the United States, and Europe are pushing companies to increase disclosure of environment, social, and governance issues to help manage risks and allow investors to make more informed decisions about long-term performance.“Even where water is widely available, water purification and waste treatment infrastructure limitations could increase costs or constrain our operations,” said the submission by Denver- and Montreal-based Molson Coors, which scored a B in CDP’s latest climate change rankings released this week.“Climate change may increase water scarcity and cause a deterioration of water quality in areas where we maintain brewing operations,” the beer maker stated in information released by CDP.The submission from Quebecor said a primary driver of climate-related risk to the operations of the media and telecommunications company is “increased severity of extreme weather events such as cyclones and floods.”The Montreal-based company noted recent studies that suggest buried internet infrastructure is at risk from sea levels rising in as soon as 15 years.Quebecor’s submission characterized the risks as “unlikely” to play out, however, and said the magnitude of any impact from what the characterized as a long-term risk would be low. It received a score of D.Cogeco Inc., a rival Montreal-based telecommunications company, appeared more concerned about the potential impact of rising sea levels. In its 15-page report to CDP, Cogeco said it could lead to an increase in capital costs, particularly at facilities and portions of its network located in areas close to the coastline, such as in Florida.“Rising sea levels could result in inundation of coastal and underground infrastructure,” Cogeco said. “These meteorological phenomena could heavily impact and destroy the facilities, the network, and therefore would prevent the delivery of services to customers.”Cogeco rated the risk as “likely” and “short-term” and characterized the magnitude of impact as “medium-high.”Explaining the potential financial impact, the cable firm, which received a climate-change score of C from CDP, said networking maintenance costs could increase due to floods, and that the financial impact would depend on the facility concerned. Cogeco noted that insurance related costs could also be impacted.Different views on the same issue may come down to what a company considers material information for investors, said Catherine McCall, executive director of the Canadian Coalition for Good Governance, who says the issue of materiality creates “the mother of all questions in this area.”“Is it helpful to disclose risks no matter how distant or uncertain, for example? The problem is always going to be ‘what’s material’ and there is no precise answer simply because discretion and judgment will invariably come into play,” she said.“Erring on the side of caution and including a risk may be the most prudent way to go.”Companies are making these judgment calls to meet increasing investor and regulatory demands for information about the risks and opportunities related to climate change and other environmental, social, and governance issues, she said. Large institutional investors, such as those behind the CCGG, are demanding this information to help them forecast the long-term financial performance of the companies they invest in.Last week, the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) issued a statement emphasizing the importance of companies disclosing ESG matters that could have material short-term and long term impact on their business operations.In its statement, IOSCO noted that investors are seeking “enhanced reliability and comparability of ESG information and disclosures, in order to facilitate a more accurate assessment of risk and, accordingly, more informed investment decisions.”Financial Post ‘Is it climate change?’: Unexpected early thaw in B.C. a relief for Centerra Gold’s Mount Milligan mine ← Previous Next → More Facebook Share this storyNo clean water for beer? Here are climate change risks keeping Canadian companies up at night Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Comment Doug Ford’s new climate plan makes the same fundamental mistake the carbon tax did What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Featured Stories Reddit Related Stories No clean water for beer? Here are climate change risks keeping Canadian companies up at night 6,000 companies look at worst-case scenarios as investors seek answers on what climate change will mean to business advertisement 16 Comments Barbara Shecter ‘Green virtue’: Cities ramming through flawed climate change policies despite mounting costs to consumers Join the conversation →last_img read more

Tesla owner manages to make Netflix run on Model 3s big screen

first_imgTesla has been blocking video playback on the giant screens in its vehicles for obvious safety reasons, but now a Tesla owner managed to stream videos with Netflix on his Model 3’s touchscreen. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Tesla owner manages to make Netflix run on Model 3’s big screen appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

Lack of overtaking makes for boring races Hamilton

first_imgShare on LinkedIn Lack of overtaking makes for boring races – Hamilton Formula One 2008 … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Since you’re here… Formula One Share on Messenger Fri 5 Sep 2008 21.07 EDT Lewis Hamilton is leading the drivers’ championship by six points. Photograph: Felix Heyder/EPA Share on WhatsApp Motor sport Lewis Hamilton has admitted that formula one is running the risk of becoming “boring” because the circuits do not allow enough chances for the drivers to overtake.The McLaren driver described last month’s European grand prix – held on a street circuit in Valencia – as dull. And, as the recent Hungarian grand prix was also notable for its lack of opportunities to pass an opponent, Hamilton feels that something needs to be done. “We do need to be able to follow closely and do more overtaking, for sure, because it gets boring,” he said. Shares00 “In Valencia, there was no overtaking at all so it can be a bit dull. I definitely support the move to try to make formula one more exciting. The problem [in Valencia] was that you couldn’t get close to other cars, which is the same at a lot of the circuits.”Today the McLaren driver will try to move up a gear as he attempts to snatch pole position from Felipe Massa after trailing behind the Brazilian’s Ferrari in practice yesterday. Massa continued where he left off in Valencia by heading the field after the first two sessions of practice but Hamilton, third fastest in the morning and fourth in the afternoon, believes he is well-placed to seize a place at the front of the grid on a circuit notorious for its fickle weather and its difficulty to overtake.The British driver, who has won the last three grands prix staged in the wet, said: “We got some good data this morning before the rain came so we’re in good shape for final free practice and qualifying,” he said. “This track is a great challenge in the dry, but in the wet it will be so tricky,” he said, before adding: “If it is wet, I’ll look forward to it. We were strong in [the rain] in Monaco and Silverstone, so I don’t mind.” First published on Fri 5 Sep 2008 21.07 EDT Formula One 2008center_img Share on Facebook Share via Email Lewis Hamilton Share on Twitter Ian Parkes and Maurice Hamilton at Spa-Francorchamps Topics Share on Facebook Share via Email Support The Guardian The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Share on Twitter Read more Share on Pinterest Reuse this contentlast_img read more

DOJ Returns To Russia Nuclear Bribery Scheme And Announces Additional Criminal Charges

first_imgPrevious posts here and here highlighted the DOJ’s 2015 Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action concerning a Russian nuclear bribery scheme.As highlighted in the previous posts, Daren Condrey pleaded guilty to FCPA violations for allegedly bribing Vadim Mikerin.Mikerin was an alleged Russian “foreign official” because he worked for TENAM Corp. (a Maryland corporation) because TENAM was a wholly-owned subsidiary on TENEX – an entity “indirectly owned and controlled by, and performed functions of, the government of the [Russian government].”Today, the DOJ returned to this same core conduct and announced:“Mark Lambert [pictured], 54, of Mount Airy, Maryland, was charged in an 11-count indictment with one count of conspiracy to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and to commit wire fraud, seven counts of violating the FCPA, two counts of wire fraud and one count of international promotion money laundering.  The charges stem from an alleged scheme to bribe Vadim Mikerin, a Russian official at JSC Techsnabexport (TENEX), a subsidiary of Russia’s State Atomic Energy Corporation and the sole supplier and exporter of Russian Federation uranium and uranium enrichment services to nuclear power companies worldwide, in order to secure contracts with TENEX.”The release states:“According to the indictment, beginning at least as early as 2009 and continuing until October 2014, Lambert conspired with others at “Transportation Corporation A” to make corrupt and fraudulent bribery and kickback payments to offshore bank accounts associated with shell companies, at the direction of, and for the benefit of, a Russian official, Vadim Mikerin, in order to secure improper business advantages and obtain and retain business with TENEX.   In order to effectuate and conceal the corrupt and fraudulent bribe payments, Lambert and others allegedly caused fake invoices to be prepared, purportedly from TENEX to Transportation Corporation A, that described services that were never provided, and then Lambert and others caused Transportation Corporation A to wire the corrupt payments for those purported services to shell companies in Latvia, Cyprus and Switzerland.  Lambert and others also allegedly used code words like “lucky figures,” “LF,” “lucky numbers,” and “cake” to describe the payments in emails to the Russian official at his personal email account.  The indictment also alleges that Lambert and others caused Transportation Corporation A to overbill TENEX by building the cost of the corrupt payments into their invoices, and TENEX thus overpaid for Transportation Corporation A’s services.”As noted in the release:“In June 2015, Lambert’s former co-president, Daren Condrey, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to violate the FCPA and commit wire fraud, and Vadim Mikerin pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit money laundering involving violations of the FCPA.  Mikerin is currently serving a sentence of 48 months in prison and Condrey is awaiting sentencing.  The indictment includes allegations against Lambert based on his role in effectuating the criminal scheme with Condrey, Mikerin, and others.”See here for the indictment.last_img read more

The Sum of All our Economic Fears

first_img « Is the Fed the Only Means of Creating Money? Categories: Monetary Reform A lot of people have written in about my comments concerning how the world is completely in a state of global chaos which is why this year I will be providing a continued video update for the 2019 WEC attendees. Those looking at the arrays of many markets are also starting to notice how global markets are correlating on a worldwide basis. Never before have I witnessed such mass correlation around the world which is demonstrating that this is by no means about local issues or the rise and fall of GDP, interest rates, or inflation. We are facing a VERY serious crisis and this is part of the Monetary Crisis CycleAttendees of Orlando will receive a special report on the Monetary Crisis Cycle outlining the timing and what we should expect as the years unfold. It is clear that our computer is picking up on this great convergence never before witnessed in financial history. This year’s WEC we will be covering the world to reveal just how we are all connected and how to keep track of this insanity that we are going to embark upon.This is clearly the sum of all our economic fears. How we deal with this in the months ahead may dictate our individual survival.last_img read more

Measles cases on the rise in Europe

first_imgMeasles rash: Image Credit: Phichet Chaiyabin / Shutterstock Measles Measles Symptoms Measles Causes Measles Diagnosis Measles Treatment Measles History Further Reading By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDAug 20 2018According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there is a sharp rise in the number of measles cases across Europe in the first six months of this year. Measles has affected over 41,000 individuals and killed 37, says the WHO.This week in a report from the agency’s Europe office, experts have said that these numbers are higher than the numbers for the whole year in the past decade. In 2017 for example the total number of cases was 23,927 and in 2016 the numbers were only 5,273. Dr. Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO regional director for Europe, said in a statement, “We are seeing a dramatic increase in infections and extended outbreaks. We call on all countries to immediately implement broad, context-appropriate measures to stop further spread of this disease. Good health for all starts with immunization.”center_img Measles is a viral illness characterized by fever, rashes, runny nose, red and watery eyes and often an impaired immune system. In most cases it resolves within 10 days. In some cases, however, it may become life threatening. Some of the life-threatening complications of measles include brain inflammation encephalitis, meningitis, liver inflammation hepatitis, pneumonias and febrile convulsions.In the 1960’s the infection was virtually wiped out of the United States after an effective vaccine was administered to babies. The vaccine offers a combination of protection from measles, mumps and rubella. The infection is highly contagious and often spreads rapidly within the unvaccinated via droplets released on coughing and sneezing. Babies who are too young to be vaccinated are also vulnerable. There has been a recent spike in cases among travellers who are unvaccinated. The spike in cases began around two decades back when an erroneous research paper linked MMR vaccine to autism. This discredited the vaccine and many parents stopped immunizing their children. Unvaccinated populations contracted the infection and it spread rapidly giving rise to these cases. According to the WHO report, half the cases in Europe (around 23000) have been seen in Ukraine. Nations like France, Greece, Georgia, Russia, Serbia and Italy have over 1000 cases of the infection as well. England has seen 807 cases in the first half of this year.WHO has called for mass immunization campaigns, raising public awareness and also better surveillance to prevent spread of the infection. They have warned that unless curbed, measles could become endemic in Europe.According to the Public Health England 9PHE), the cases in England are mostly due to unvaccinated people travelling to areas in mainland Europe where there are outbreaks of measles at present. Dr Mary Ramsay, head of immunisation at PHE explained that most of these cases are among adults and teenagers who have not been vaccinated as children. “Anyone who missed out on their MMR vaccine in the past or are unsure if they had two doses should contact their GP practice to catch up.We would encourage people to ensure they are up to date with their MMR vaccine before travelling to countries with ongoing measles outbreaks, heading to large gatherings such as festivals, or before starting university,” she said. The NHS recommends that all children should receive the MMR vaccine around their first birthday and then again before they started school.Dr Nedret Emiroglu, from the WHO said in a statement, “This partial setback demonstrates that every under-immunised person remains vulnerable no matter where they live, and every country must keep pushing to increase coverage and close immunity gaps.”last_img read more

Rosetta missions lander settles on a comet and makes history

first_imgIf healthy, the lander will now pursue a preprogrammed science routine on battery power lasting about 2.5 days. With sufficient solar power, Philae could continue to work for months. And already, 11 science instruments on the Rosetta orbiter have been taking measurements of 67P’s coal-black, organic-rich crust. But Philae, equipped with a drill that can sample more than 20 centimeters deep, has the potential to reveal the nature of material lying underneath the crust—where ice, dust, and organic molecules have been less altered by sunlight and outgassing. The sun’s heat causes buried ices of water, carbon dioxide, and other molecules to burst forth in diffuse jets of gas and dust.Moments after the landing, Philae lead scientist Jean-Pierre Bibring, of the Institute for Space Astrophysics in Orsay, France, was passing out toasts of Nicolas Feuillatte, a Champagne he had on hand for the occasion. He said he hadn’t been so nervous about the outcome. “As when you go to a plane, you are not the driver,” he says. “We couldn’t do more than what we did.”Getting to the moment was by no means easy. The Rosetta spacecraft launched in 2004 and whirled around the solar system on one of the longest planetary journeys ever, traveling 6.5 billion kilometers. In August, Rosetta arrived at 67P, and scientists began a frantic effort to map the feeble gravity of the comet’s mountain-sized nucleus even as they searched for boulder-free, level landing terrains. The time pressures were severe because Rosetta had to drop Philae before 67P got too close to the sun’s heat. An instrument on Rosetta is already measuring 5 liters per second of water vapor production, but that rate is expected to rise to 500 liters per second by the time 67P makes its closest approach to the sun in August 2015. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS/DLR The target area of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko looms 3 kilometers below the Philae lander as it descends to the surface. DARMSTADT, GERMANY—The Rosetta orbiter on Wednesday dropped a spidery, three-legged robot the size of a small refrigerator and watched as it tentatively set down on a comet—the first time that the surface of these primordial balls of dust and ice has ever been explored.In the hours after the 11:03 a.m. U.S. Eastern Standard Time touchdown, European scientists and engineers struggled to make sense of how stably the lander was resting on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Radio connections between the lander and the orbiter were tenuous, solar power generation was fluctuating, and the lander was not anchored by two harpoons that were supposed to have fired on touchdown. It was even possible that the lander, called Philae, had slipped or bounced—but not hard enough to fling it back into the void. Stephan Ulamec, the Philae project manager for the European Space Agency (ESA), said that the lander’s scientific instruments were taking data and that he was confident Philae would live for another day. “Maybe today, we didn’t just land once, but twice,” he said at a press briefing at ESA’s control center here.In addition to being a first for humanity, the €1.4 billion Rosetta mission marked a strikingly ambitious effort for ESA’s planetary exploration program. It was the first successful landing for the agency since January 2005, when ESA dropped the Huygens probe onto the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan. To a packed audience here, ESA Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain celebrated the historic aspect of the comet landing with obvious pride. “We’re the first to have done that, and it will stay that way forever,” he said. The mission team settled on a relatively risk-free region on the “head” of the duck-shaped comet, where only 20% of the terrain contained potentially hazardous slopes greater than 30°. Plans were hatched for the 7-hour landing descent and were loaded up to the spacecraft.The landing almost didn’t take place. In the night before separation, software trouble nearly forced Ulamec to postpone it for 2 weeks. Ulamec also learned that gas thrusters—meant to pin the lander to the surface while its harpoons fired—hadn’t pressurized correctly. But mission managers decided to go ahead anyway, and just past 4 a.m. EST on Wednesday, Philae slipped out of Rosetta’s grasp at walking speeds.Step by step, Rosetta’s instruments followed the lander down and found it to be right on track. A picture taken by a camera on the underbelly of the lander at a 3-kilometer altitude showed it to be nearly in the middle of a 1-kilometer-wide landing ellipse. “The real error was much smaller than the error ellipse,” says ESA Head of Mission Operations Paolo Ferri. Sensors on the legs of the lander indicated that the surface was soft and had helped dampen Philae’s fall.But team members were still confused by conflicting data coming back from the lander, and ESA officials planned to reconvene on Thursday in Darmstadt—hopefully with more answers. “It’s complicated to land on a comet,” Ulamec says. “It’s also very complicated to understand what has happened.”To read more Rosetta coverage, visit our Rosetta collection page.last_img read more

Scientists say were on the cusp of a carbon dioxide–recycling revolution

first_imgWithin a few years, we could be capturing the carbon dioxide emitted by power plants and recycling it into fuel. Victor Lauer/Shutterstock Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Every year, the billions of metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) we release into the atmosphere add to the growing threat of climate change. But what if we could simply recycle all that wasted CO2 and turn it into something useful?By adding electricity, water, and a variety of catalysts, scientists can reduce CO2 into short molecules such as carbon monoxide and methane, which they can then combine to form more complex hydrocarbon fuels like butane. Now, researchers think we could be on the cusp of a CO2-recycling revolution, which would capture CO2 from power plants—and maybe even directly from the atmosphere—and convert it into these fuels at scale, they report today in Joule.Science talked with one of the study’s authors, materials scientists and graduate student Phil De Luna at the University of Toronto in Canada, about how CO2 recycling works—and what the future holds for these technologies. This interview has been edited for clarity and length. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Matt WarrenMar. 29, 2018 , 12:00 PM Scientists say we’re on the cusp of a carbon dioxide–recycling revolution Q: Why CO2 recycling?A: The developed world has been emitting CO2 almost frivolously for a really long time, and there’s a lot that can be done there. But I could imagine a day when the entire energy mix is fueled by renewable energy sources, and then all of the hydrocarbon products—consumable plastics, the fuels that you need for long-term energy storage and heating your home in the winter—all of that could be derived from CO2 conversion. And then when that happens, CO2 becomes a way to store renewable energy, in chemical form, over long periods of time, in a stable way. And that’s kind of the goal—to have CO2 be a carrier of energy rather than just being a waste or an emission.Q: Where did the idea come from? A: The idea stems from artificial photosynthesis: Whereas nature has been able to take light, CO2, and water and create food, we’re looking at ways of engineering devices to take CO2, renewable energy, and water, and reduce that into more value-added products.Q: How does this technology convert CO2 into fuel?A: [It’s] kind of like a reverse fuel cell. There’s a cathode and an anode; at the anode, water is split into protons and oxygen gas, and at the cathode, CO2 is electrochemically reduced to other value-added chemicals, such as carbon monoxide, methane, ethylene. So you are feeding CO2 protons and electrons [from the water and the electricity], and you are electrochemically reducing them.Q: It sounds like you can make a lot of molecules from this process. How would you decide which ones to produce? A: We took an economic approach, and looked at all the hydrocarbon fuels which you could potentially make with CO2. Even though [molecules with more carbon atoms] are more energy dense, it takes more energy to make them. So for the current technology that we have, it makes more sense to stick with [molecules with fewer carbon atoms] such as ethylene or carbon monoxide, and then to upgrade those molecules using other processes.Q: Is this technology ready to use now?A: The scale-up and the advancements that have been happening in the last couple of years are really quite incredible. In terms of how close we are to industrial impact—it’s really a matter of maybe 5 to 10 years.Q: What other methods could be used for recycling CO2 in the future?A: In photocatalysis the driving force is sunlight [rather than electricity]. Biohybrid systems combine something like electrocatalysis or photocatalysis with enzymes or microbes that can upgrade the products of CO2 conversion into finer chemicals. Molecular machines are this idea that we could make molecular-scale factories that can take in CO2, break apart the bonds, and rearrange the atoms all on the atomic scale. That’s a really far out and optimistic idea, but … it may one day be a possibility.Q: What do you think will decide which technology ultimately wins out?A: At the end of the day it’s always going to be the market—which technology can get enough industrial sponsorship and acceptance from industry. That’s the one that’s going to win out, that’s the one that’ll be implemented at scale, and that’s the one the one that’ll be competitive. These large energy companies are looking for ways to diversify their portfolios and technology. And this idea … fits perfectly into what they’re skilled at, and it really hedges the bets against becoming irrelevant.last_img read more

Cardiac arrest kills most victims outside the hospital Could an artificial heartlung

first_img Email “We all really want it to work,” says Clifton Callaway, an emergency medicine physician at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania. But he and others are awaiting a verdict from clinical trials now underway. One worry is that people rescued by ECPR may have a poor quality of life afterward, for example, because of cognitive impairment. Another question is whether the technology, which requires extensive training, an overhaul of paramedic practices, and tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars per patient to implement, is worth whatever benefit it confers.Still, doctors crave a better treatment for cardiac arrest, which can result from blocked arteries, drug overdoses, hypothermia, and other causes. Only about 10% of the 350,000 or so adults in the United States whose hearts stop outside a hospital each year survive. The chest compressions of CPR offer, “at best, 25% of normal” blood flow, says Steven Brooks, an emergency medicine physician at Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada. With ECPR that soars to 100%.Japan was the first to publish case studies of ECPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, beginning in the 1980s. In 2015, an Australian team wrote in Resuscitation that 14 of 24 patients survived without neurological problems after having a cardiac arrest inside or outside of the hospital and receiving treatment with ECPR and other interventions. The University of Minnesota (UM) in Minneapolis has treated more patients with ECPR than anywhere else in the United States, more than 200 in the past 3 years. The team published late last year in Resuscitation that of 100 people, 40 survived and fared well. Some had minimal deficits, such as mild short-term memory loss, but were expected to improve with time, UM cardiologist and critical care physician Jason Bartos says. “You have the sickest patients … [and] an opportunity to provide a big benefit,” he adds.Just how big that opportunity is remains an open question. Doctors like Bartos and Callaway—whose hospital uses ECPR on about five people brought in with cardiac arrest each year—know that medicine is littered with tales of phenomenal treatments that falter during randomized trials. One worry about the observational research, such as the reports from Japan and Minnesota, is that the patients receiving ECPR may have already had a better chance of survival than most, skewing the results.With that in mind, investigators have launched randomized trials to compare ECPR to standard CPR. The largest, in the Czech Republic, is slated to report results next year. “If you don’t do a trial early on, then it will be implemented very widely, and it’s very difficult to step back and re-evaluate whether it actually is useful,” says Marcel van de Poll, a critical care physician at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands. His is one of six Dutch hospitals that enrolled the first of a planned 110 people in May 2017. Like many trials in emergency medicine, it doesn’t obtain consent at the time of enrollment because the patient is unconscious and time is too precious to seek consent from family members. A third trial, in Minneapolis, expects to launch this summer.The ethics of ECPR weigh heavily and are one reason doctors consider trials so important. ECPR is a desperate measure and an invasive one, including what one doctor describes as “garden hose–size catheters” inserted into the groin. “We have no idea whether these patients would like to be under such a type of care,” says Jan Bělohlávek, a cardiologist at Charles University in Prague who is leading the Czech trial. He enrolled the first patient in 2013 and the 185th last week. The majority of those on ECPR still die, Bělohlávek points out, and it is “a very bad dying”: Unlike a cardiac arrest followed by sudden death, with ECPR, patients can endure slow-motion organ failure, coupled with anguish among loved ones watching the decline.Whereas guidelines govern when to stop CPR, with ECPR, “all of a sudden you’re supporting heart and lung function, you can support [that] indefinitely, which may create conundrums,” says Brian Grunau, an emergency medicine physician at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. In January, he and his colleagues described in Circulation treating a young person with ECPR who sustained severe brain damage, whose family initially resisted removing life support.One of the biggest fears has been that ECPR might rescue patients only to leave them in dismal shape. Centers performing ECPR say this happens only rarely. But it does happen. In Minneapolis, six patients of 100 were left with severe brain damage; all died of infections within a few months. In Prague, four patients who initially survived died within 6 months of heart failure, sepsis, or pneumonia.Whether to implement ECPR across whole cities and regions won’t be an easy decision, many believe. Even if it works well, it may be best for a small subset of cardiac arrest patients: people who are relatively young, have few other health issues, and experienced a fixable problem that caused their heart to stop, such as a blocked artery. And yet, “That’s why it’s so enticing,” Brooks says. “The people who it could help are those who are in the prime of their life.” Scott Youngquist & Joseph Tonna Cardiac arrest kills most victims outside the hospital. Could an artificial heart-lung machine help? Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img A team in the University of Utah Health eCPR Program puts a patient on the life support machinery. A consortium at the university is gathering data on how people who have cardiac arrests outside of the hospital fare after being hooked up to it. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Jennifer Couzin-FrankelFeb. 28, 2019 , 12:20 PM Real-life medical theater doesn’t get much more dramatic: A 66-year-old tourist collapsed in the Louvre in Paris, in front of a painting by Eugène Delacroix. Firefighters stationed at the museum administered CPR. Then, a French “mobile intensive care unit”—delayed by rush hour traffic and arriving 19 minutes later—swooped in. Surrounded by majestic artwork, the medical team hooked up the patient to a high-tech life support system: Liters of his blood were routed outside his body, infused with oxygen, and pumped back in.The man, treated several years ago, died within 24 hours of arriving at a hospital. But the strategy to try to save him, called extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), is sparking excitement in medical circles—and some anxiety. The machinery for ECPR is already widely used to support patients in heart surgery and sometimes to rescue those who suffer cardiac arrest in the hospital. It also treats infants and children teetering near death from heart or lung failure. (In pediatrics, it’s known as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or ECMO.)Now, efforts are spreading to apply ECPR to adults who, like the tourist in Paris, suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital. Although Paris has deployed ECPR in museums and on subway platforms, most cities limit it to emergency rooms or catheterization labs.last_img read more

Indonesian vaccine fatwa sends measles immunization rates plummeting

first_img FACHRUL REZA/NURPHOTO/GETTY IMAGES Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email By Dyna Rochmyaningsih Nov. 7, 2018 , 3:05 PM As the bell rang on a recent morning at an elementary school here and pupils filled the classrooms, anxious adults crowded the corridors outside. It was vaccination day, but many parents in this North Sumatra village did not want their children immunized with a new measles-rubella (MR) vaccine. Some told the teacher their children were at home, not feeling well. Others were there to make sure their kids didn’t get the jab. They whispered the reason with disgust: The vaccine “contains elements of pork.” By the time the vaccination team left, only six out of 38 students had been immunized.Millions of parents around Indonesia have eschewed the vaccine in recent months, after Islamic clerics declared the MR vaccine “haram,” or forbidden under Islamic law because pig components are used in its manufacturing. Vaccine coverage has plummeted as a result, alarming public health experts who worry that the world’s largest Muslim-majority country could see new waves of measles and more miscarriages and birth defects resulting from rubella infections during pregnancy.Indonesia has long used a locally produced measles vaccine as part of its childhood vaccination scheme, but coverage has been patchy, and until recently, the country had one of the highest measles burdens in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Last year, as part of a WHO-led plan to eliminate measles and rubella globally by 2020, Indonesia switched to a combined MR vaccine, produced by the Serum Institute of India in Mumbai. The Ministry of Health launched an ambitious catchup campaign targeting 67 million children aged 9 months to 15 years. The first phase, in 2017 on the island of Java, was a success; all six provinces reached the 95% coverage target, and measles and rubella cases dropped by more than 90%. Children are immunized against measles and rubella at a school in Aceh in Indonesia, where coverage so far is only 8%.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Indonesian ‘vaccine fatwa’ sends measles immunization rates plummeting But the rollout to the rest of the country, originally scheduled for August and September of this year, ran into trouble. Just before it began, the Indonesian Ulama Council (MUI) of the Riau Islands, a provincial Islamic body, raised concerns that the new MR vaccine had not been certified as “halal,” or lawful, by the central MUI in Jakarta, the highest authority in such matters. The letter asked for vaccinations to be postponed. The news quickly spread throughout the country, stoking distrust among parents.To salvage the campaign, the health ministry in August lobbied the central MUI to issue a fatwa—a ruling under Islamic law—declaring the vaccine halal. Instead, the council declared the MR vaccine haram, based on its ingredients and manufacturing process. Like many vaccines, it is made using several porcine components. Trypsin, an enzyme, helps separate the cells in which the vaccine viruses are grown from their glass container. Gelatin derived from pigs’ skin serves as a stabilizer, protecting vaccine viruses as they are freeze-dried.MUI took pains not to block the vaccination campaign. It ruled that parents could still have their children vaccinated, given the need to protect public health. “Trusted experts have explained the dangers posed by not being immunized,” MUI said, a message it reiterated at a public consultation with Health Minister Nila Moeloek on 18 September.But local clerics and confused parents have drawn their own conclusions. In contrast to the success on Java, coverage of children on other islands has reached only 68% so far, according to the health ministry, which did not respond to interview requests. In some regions it is far worse—just 8% in Aceh, for example, a province ruled by sharia law.A spokesperson for WHO’s country office in Jakarta notes that Indonesia is hardly the only country where trust in vaccination has eroded and says WHO remains optimistic about the campaign. Although the fatwa “has caused some confusion at local levels, it is in fact clear in its directive and ultimately supportive” of vaccination, the spokesperson wrote in an email. WHO is working with the Indonesian government, which has extended the catch-up campaign until December, to expand the coverage.Failure could be a major setback for public health. Measles can cause deafness, blindness, seizures, permanent brain damage, and even death; vaccination coverage needs to be at 95% to reach herd immunity, in which even nonvaccinated people are protected. That threshold is about 80% for rubella. At lower levels, a paradoxical effect can occur: Some women who would otherwise have an innocuous infection early in life now catch the virus while pregnant, raising their risk of miscarriage or giving birth to babies with congenital rubella syndrome—whose symptoms include blindness, deafness, heart defects, and mental disabilities. “We can’t play” with the MR vaccine, says Elizabeth Jane Soepardi, an independent public health expert who until January was director of disease surveillance and quarantine at the health ministry. Low vaccination rates “could mean a boomerang for us,” she says.There is no ready alternative; no MR vaccines have been certified as halal anywhere. (Indonesia’s previous measles vaccine didn’t have a halal certificate either, which has not hampered its use.) Arifianto Apin, a Muslim pediatrician in Jakarta who advocates for vaccination within the Indonesian Pediatric Society, says education may help. Clerics in many Muslim countries have concluded that gelatin in vaccines is halal because it has undergone hydrolysis, a chemical transformation that purifies it under an Islamic legal concept called istihalah. And in 2013, the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore declared a rotavirus vaccine halal despite the use of trypsin; it ruled that the enzyme had been made pure by dilution and the addition of other pure compounds, which is known as istihlak. If Muslim parents learn about the diverse legal views within Islam, Apin says, “they won’t hesitate to vaccinate their children.”If that doesn’t happen, the only solution is to develop a halal vaccine as soon as possible, says Art Reingold, an epidemiologist at the University of California, Berkeley. Neni Nurainy, the lead scientist at Indonesia’s state-owned vaccine company, Bio Farma, in Bandung notes that nonporcine vaccine stabilizers exist, for instance; the company plans to start to investigate bovine gelatin as a replacement. But development and clinical trials could take 6 to 10 years, she says. “In the meantime, many will be made ill and some may die avoidable deaths,” Reingold says.WHO, however, is steering clear of the religious debate and won’t recommend the development of a halal vaccine. “WHO works with regulatory authorities and manufacturers to ensure vaccines have the highest standards of safety and efficacy,” the spokesperson says. “We don’t assess vaccines on other criteria.”last_img read more

Hobbit Island Where Humans and Animals Shrink

first_imgOn the Indonesian island of Flores live a “Pygmy” people, whose average height is 4 foot 9 inches tall with normal human proportion. They’ve been there for centuries. In 2003, researchers exploring a mountain cave discovered ancient fossils of a tiny, human-like being with a chimp-sized brain that was the size of an “average American kindergartner.” It was logical to assume that today’s population is descended from the beings dubbed “Hobbits.”However, scientists have recently discovered, to their surprise, no DNA connection exists between the two groups that lived tens of thousands of years apart. “A modern pygmy population living on an Indonesian island near a cave with Homo floresiensis (‘hobbit’) fossils appears to have evolved short stature independently,” according to the report released in August 2018 by Princeton University.A cast of the Homo floresiensis skull, American Museum of Natural History. Photo by Ryan Somma CC BY-SA 2.0The extinct Hobbit group “definitely have a lot of Neanderthal,” said Princeton’s Dr. Serena Tucci, who was the first author on a paper published Aug. 3 in the journal Science that detailed their findings. “They have a little bit of Denisovan. We expected that, because we knew there was some migration that went from Oceania to Flores, so there was some shared ancestry of these populations.”Scientists have discovered a separate branch of hominins, known as the Denisovans. It’s believed that Denisovans and humans interbred. People in East Asia, Australia, and the South Pacific still carry a bit of Denisovan DNA.Cast of Homo floresiensis LB1 (left) compared to a microcephalic skull. Photo by Avandergeer from English Wikipedia CC BY 3.0Still, why are the beings so small on Flores? No one is sure. Moreover, it gets stranger. Some animals are smaller on Flores than in other places.The New York Times reported: “The study shows that at least twice in ancient history, humans and their relatives (known as hominins) arrived on Flores and then grew shorter. And not just humans: Other research has shown that elephants also arrived on Flores twice, and both times the species evolved into dwarves. So what mysterious power does this island have to shrink the body?”Reconstruction of female Homo floresiensis based on LB-1. Photo by Cicero Moraes CC BY 4.0The dwarf elephants on Flores, which are now extinct, only reached as high as the shoulder of a human. But after evaluating related species found elsewhere in Southeast Asia, their ancestors reached full size.“Flores is a magical place where things go and get small,” geneticist Prof Joshua Akey at Princeton University told the BBC.It might have something to do with the diet on the island.Dr Tucci added: “In geographically diverse and environmentally extreme regions, a gene called FADS seems to act like a ‘toggle-switch’ in helping animals switch to between largely animal or plant-based diets.”The Lesser Sunda Islands with Flores in the upper right.Similar “shrinking” changes have been found in Bronze age humans who had to live on plant-based diets from farming vegetables and grains. These FADS genes “have been associated with dietary adaptations in other fish-eating populations, including the Inuit in Greenland,” reported Science Daily.Related Video: Mystery of the Rotating Island called “The Eye”“Dramatic size changes in animals isolated on islands is a common phenomenon, often attributed to limited food resources and freedom from predators. In general, large species tend to get smaller and small species tend to get larger on islands. At the time of H. floresiensis, Flores was home to dwarf elephants, giant Komodo dragons, giant birds and giant rats, all of which left bones in the Liang Bua cave.”Interestingly, the scientists found key differences in wrists and feet between the Hobbit group and today’s Pygmys, with the theory being that the ancient group had to climb trees in order to escape the giant Komodo dragons.Top view of a cast of the LB1 skull. Ray from Queens, USA CC BY-SA 2.0“Islands are very special places for evolution,” Dr. Tucci said. “This process, insular dwarfism, resulted in smaller mammals, like hippopotamus and elephants, and smaller humans.”Read another story from us: Pompeii victim: A man’s skeleton found, his skull crushed by a boulder as he tried to fleeBut what’s amazing is that a form of isolated dwarfism took place independently at least twice on Flores Island, in H. floresiensis and again in the modern pygmies.“This is really intriguing because it means that evolutionarily, we are not that special,” said Dr. Tucci. “Humans are like other mammals; we are subject to the same processes.”Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.com.last_img read more

Hong Kong police fire tear gas in running battles with extradition bill

first_img Hong Kong police, Umbrella Movement Hong Kong, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement protest, Xi Jinping, Chinese president, Yellow Umbrella protest, Yellow Umbrella protest Hong Kong, world news, Indian Express The yellow umbrella was the trademark of those demonstrations. (File)Hong Kong police fired multiple volleys of tear gas at demonstrators who threw plastic bottles in running battles outside the city’s legislature, angry at an extradition bill that would allow people to be sent to mainland China for trial. China denies accusations that it tramples on human rights and official media said this week “foreign forces” were trying to damage China by creating chaos over the extradition bill. Prosperous China says ‘men preferred’ and women lose More Explained Tens of thousands of protesters had gathered peacefully in the Chinese-ruled city before tempers flared, some charging police with umbrellas.Police warned them back, saying: “We will use force.” The protesters, most of them young people dressed in black, had erected barricades as they prepared to hunker down for an extended occupation of the area, in scenes reminiscent of pro-democracy “Occupy” protests that gridlocked the former British colony in 2014.The yellow umbrella was the trademark of those demonstrations. Protesters rallied in and around Lung Wo Road, a main east-west artery near the offices of embattled Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, as hundreds of armed riot police, some with plastic shields, warned them to stop advancing. Advertising China GDP growth slows to 6.2% in second quarter Advertising Trump says ‘will take a look’ at accusations over Google, China “Didn’t we say at the end of the Umbrella movement we would be back?” pro-democracy lawmaker Claudia Mo said, referring to the name often used for the “Occupy” demonstrations, whose trademark was the yellow umbrella.Hong Kong police, Umbrella Movement Hong Kong, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement protest, Xi Jinping, Chinese president, Yellow Umbrella protest, Yellow Umbrella protest Hong Kong, world news, Indian Express Tens of thousands of protesters had gathered peacefully in the Chinese-ruled city before tempers flared. (File)“Now we are back!” she said as supporters echoed her words. Others once again called for Lam to step down.Opposition to the bill on Sunday triggered Hong Kong’s biggest political demonstration since its handover from British to Chinese rule in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” deal guaranteeing its special autonomy, including freedom of assembly, free press, and an independent judiciary.But many accuse China of extensive meddling since, including obstruction of democratic reforms, interference with local elections and of being behind the disappearance of five Hong Kong-based booksellers, starting in 2015, who specialized in works critical of Chinese leaders. Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Taking stock of monsoon rain “The practice of ‘one country, two systems’ in Hong Kong has achieved remarkable success. This is an undeniable objective fact,” Taiwan Affairs Office spokesman An Fengshan told a regular news briefing in Beijing.China firmly supports the Hong Kong government in passing an extradition law, the foreign ministry reiterated.FOOD, GOGGLES, AND BRICKSMany of the protesters, who skipped work, school or university to join the rally, defied police calls to retreat and passed around provisions, including medical supplies, goggles, water, and food.Some stockpiled bricks are broken away from pavements. Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung urged the protesters to stop occupying the road and appealed for calm and restraint.“We also appeal to the people who are stationed to … disperse as soon as possible, and not to try to defy/challenge the law,” he said.The demonstrators rallied just a stone’s throw from the heart of the financial center, where glittering skyscrapers house the offices of some of the world’s biggest companies, including HSBC.Hong Kong police, Umbrella Movement Hong Kong, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement protest, Xi Jinping, Chinese president, Yellow Umbrella protest, Yellow Umbrella protest Hong Kong, world news, Indian Express Many of the protesters, who skipped work, school or university to join the rally, defied police calls to retreat and passed around provisions. (Reuters)The massive rally was also within sight of the Hong Kong garrison of China’s People’s Liberation Army, whose presence in the city has been one of the most sensitive elements of the 1997 handover.Standard Chartered, Bank of East Asia and HSBC suspended bank operations at some branches in the area.A spokesman for bourse operator Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing (HKEX) said Lam would not attend a cocktail reception on Wednesday as previously planned.The proposed bill has attracted widespread criticism at home and abroad, prompting rare criticism from judges, Hong Kong’s business community, some pro-establishment figures, and several foreign governments and business chambers.Demonstrators began joining overnight protests earlier on Wednesday as businesses across the city prepared to go on strike.Lam has sought to soothe public concerns and said her administration was creating additional amendments to the bill, including safeguarding human rights.Under the proposed law, Hong Kong residents, as well as foreign and Chinese nationals living or traveling through the city, would all be at risk if they were wanted on the mainland.Sunday’s protest, which organizers said saw more than a million people take to the streets, in addition to a growing backlash against the extradition bill, could raise questions about Lam’s ability to govern effectively.Hong Kong police, Umbrella Movement Hong Kong, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement protest, Xi Jinping, Chinese president, Yellow Umbrella protest, Yellow Umbrella protest Hong Kong, world news, Indian Express The massive rally was also within sight of the Hong Kong garrison of China’s People’s Liberation Army. (AP)CRISISThe protests have plunged Hong Kong into a political crisis, just as the 2014 demonstrations did, heaping pressure on Lam’s administration and her official backers in Beijing.The failure of the 2014 protests to wrest concessions on democracy from Beijing, coupled with the prosecutions of at least 100 mostly young protesters, initially discouraged many from returning to the streets.That changed on Sunday. The Catholic Diocese of Hong Kong called on the government not to pass the bill “hurriedly” and urged Christians to pray for the city.Lam, who warned against “radical action” at the protests, is a Catholic. Human rights groups have repeatedly cited the alleged use of torture, arbitrary detentions, forced confessions and problems accessing lawyers in China, where courts are controlled by the Communist Party, as reasons why the Hong Kong bill should not proceed. Lam has vowed to press ahead with the legislation despite deep concerns in the Asian financial hub, including among business leaders, that it could undermine those freedoms and investor confidence and erode the city’s competitive advantages.The government said the debate on the bill that was due to take place in the city’s 70-seat Legislative Council on Wednesday would be delayed until further notice.The legislature is controlled by a pro-Beijing majority. “We won’t leave till they scrap the law,” said one young man wearing a black mask and gloves. “Carrie Lam has underestimated us. We won’t let her get away with this.”Hong Kong police, Umbrella Movement Hong Kong, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement, Hong Kong Umbrella Movement protest, Xi Jinping, Chinese president, Yellow Umbrella protest, Yellow Umbrella protest Hong Kong, world news, Indian Express A protester holds up a yellow umbrella as he and others march in a rally against the proposed amendments to extradition law in Hong Kong. (AP)Beijing again reiterated that the “one country, two systems” formula was best for maintaining long-term prosperity and stability. Advertising Best Of Express LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? By Reuters |Hong Kong | Updated: June 12, 2019 4:04:15 pm Related News 0 Comment(s)last_img read more

Passengers subdue chaotic man on board Turkish Airlines jet

first_imgAssociated Press photographer Hussein Malla was on the flight Friday and says several passengers stopped the man in the Boeing 737-900’s business class section. Flight attendants calmed the man down after about 15 minutes and he was taken back to a seat as the plane continued toward Khartoum. Flight attendants said the man was complaining about not being able to breathe.After about 2 hours, the pilots announced the plane was returning to Istanbul. A few minutes later, the man suddenly stood up and headed toward the front of the plane, where others grabbed him and shackled him with plastic restraints provided by flight attendants.Passengers were yelling in fear and children were crying.The plane landed back in Istanbul about three hours after it took off and police escorted the man off. As he departed, he shook hands with some passengers and kissed children. The airline and police did not immediately respond to AP requests for comment. There was no immediate word on where the man was taken. His identity was not released, although he appeared to be Sudanese. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Post Comment(s) Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Advertising By AP |Istanbul | Published: June 15, 2019 10:27:51 pm Top News Turkish Airlines, Mumbai, Turkish Airlines Mumbai, Boeing 777 plane, Boeing 777-300ER, Turkish plane, turkey plane mumbai, istanbul Passengers were yelling in fear and children were crying.Passengers on a Turkish Airlines jetliner flying to Sudan had to subdue a man who started screaming a few minutes after takeoff and began smashing at an oxygen mask box and then a cabin window, before pushing flight attendants aside and rushing toward the cockpit.last_img read more

JK cops overhaul village defence committees PDP says Centre design to arm

first_imgWritten by Arun Sharma | Jammu | Published: July 17, 2019 4:11:58 am Advertising Best Of Express Advertising Cancel Mehbooba Mufti government’s order withdrawing cases against stone-pelters: BJP leader to N N Vohra defence committees jk, pdp jk, jk police, jammu kashmir, kashmir pdp,anti-militancy grid kashmir, kashmir militancy The PDP has described the Centre’s move of setting up of seven new village defence committees to arm RSS workers (Representational/ Express Photo by Shuaib Masoodi)The setting up of seven new village defence committees recently by the J&K Police in areas around Kishtwar town has triggered a controversy, with the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) describing it as the Centre’s move to arm RSS workers against a particular community. Kargil: NC, Congress part ways from local governance arrangement, PDP comes in PDP demands BJP leader’s arrest for threatening Kashmiri journalists The decision to overhaul the anti-militancy grid through setting of new VDCs was taken following militant activities in the hilly district, six years after it was declared militancy-free by the police, official sources said. The VDCs, comprising villagers and police officers, were earlier set up in the mid 1990s after militancy had spread to the Chenab Valley area, sources said.Senior PDP leader and former MLC Firdous Tak has said that 60 new VDC members have been deployed in communally-sensitive areas and the government is arming RSS and BJP workers against a particular community following the killing of a BJP leader and RSS functionary. This will disturb peace and communal amity in the area, he said, comparing the VDCs to the Ikhwan force — pro-government militia groups formed in the Valley in the backdrop of the militancy of the ‘90s.Tak has demanded the Governor’s administration to withdraw its decision of setting up new VDCs, failing which the PDP will take out a procession in Kishtwar town and hold a dharna at the SSP’s office on July 19.center_img Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Explained: The Hague rules on Kulbhushan Jadhav today However, Kishtwar SSP Shakti Pathak said, “We have received over 100 applications from people for setting up VDCs and a good number of them are members of majority community… As we are facing shortage of weapons, we are responding to all the requests in phases.”The anti-militancy grid had gone defunct after the last anti-militancy operation was carried out in Kishtwar district on December 23, 2012, with police personnel involved in such operations either shifted out or sent to the district police lines, sources said.When four people, including a senior BJP leader and RSS functionary, were reportedly killed by militants in Kishtwar town in two separate incidents in 2018 and this year, there were not enough inputs about the movement of militants due to the defunct grid, sources said.To strengthen the grid, the police department decided to remove older members — over 60 years of age — from the VDCs and has also shortlisted 117 such Special Police Officers in nearly 60 VDCs, besides disengaging nine others on charges of indiscipline, sources said. The Kishtwar SSP said that they had also received written requests from 352 VDC members who wanted to return their weapons as, according to them, they were now too old to handle arms.“While we have taken back weapons from those VDC members, we have asked them to give the name of any other member of their family as their replacement and these weapons will be provided to them subject to verification,” Pathak said.The hilly district already has 3,251 VDC members — nearly 800 of them SPOs — who have been provided weapons by the police. Related News Post Comment(s)last_img read more

A deadly pig disease raging in China is bound to spread to

first_imgAN MING/FEATURECHINA/Newscom Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Dennis NormileSep. 10, 2018 , 2:50 PM SHANGHAI, CHINA—African swine fever (ASF), a deadly virus in pigs and wild boar, continues to spread in China and will almost certainly wreak havoc in other countries in Asia soon. That’s the somber conclusion from a meeting of animal health experts organized by the United Nations’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in Bangkok late last week. “It’s no longer ‘if’ [spread beyond China] will happen but when, and what we can do collaboratively to prevent and minimize the damage,” FAO Chief Veterinary Officer Juan Lubroth said in a statement issued on Friday, at the end of the 3-day meeting. Veterinary authorities from 12 countries agreed to form a new network to share information and work jointly to control the spread of the disease.The virus that causes ASF doesn’t infect humans, but the most virulent strains are nearly universally fatal for pigs. There is no vaccine and no cure, so controlling the spread of the disease requires destroying all animals on infected farms. The appearance of the virus in China in August—and its inevitable spread—threatens devastating economic losses for farmers and shortages of a vital source of protein for citizens of developing countries, particularly in East and Southeast Asia.China’s agriculture ministry reported a new outbreak while the Bangkok meeting was in progress; the virus has now been found at 18 farms or slaughterhouses in six provinces, according to FAO. The outbreak sites are widely dispersed, indicating that shipments of pork products are spreading the disease; live animals aren’t usually shipped over such long distances. A deadly pig disease raging in China is bound to spread to other Asian countries, experts warn Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The virus is on the move in Eurasia and Eastern Europe as well. Bulgaria reported its first outbreak to the World Organisation for Animal Health in Paris on 31 August; the virus has also been found in Georgia, Russia, Poland, the Czech Republic, Romania, and Moldova. In Europe, the virus is appearing primarily in backyard pens and its spread likely involves wild boars. (The disease can also be transmitted by ticks.) In China, so far, the virus has appeared at larger commercial operations. If it spreads to traditional farms, it might also jump to wild boars and become endemic in the countryside, says François Roger, an animal epidemiologist at the Agricultural Research Center for International Development in Montpellier, France. The precise risk is unclear as little is known about wild boar populations in China.In an unrelated development, another pig disease has resurfaced in Japan, where the agriculture ministry has confirmed the country’s first outbreak of classical swine fever in 26 years, on a farm in Gifu prefecture in central Japan. Although they have similar names, the viruses carrying ASF and classical swine fever are unrelated. The highly virulent ASF can kill entire herds, whereas the classical swine fever virus is less virulent and less dangerous for older pigs than for piglets; it can also be prevented using vaccines. After a campaign to eliminate the virus, Japan was declared free of classical swine fever in 2007. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

MD Anderson clears researcher flagged by NIH for not disclosing foreign ties

first_imgMD Anderson clears researcher flagged by NIH for not disclosing foreign ties Email By Mara HvistendahlMay. 30, 2019 , 2:30 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, says it has concluded an investigation of the last of five researchers flagged by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) for potential violations of agency rules. The investigation “confirmed non-compliance with NIH and MD Anderson rules and policies, but such violations were not in our view serious or indicative of willful malfeasance,” the center said yesterday in a statement.The institution did not recommend any “disciplinary or corrective action” because the researcher retired voluntarily before the investigation concluded, according to the center.Last month, Science and the Houston Chronicle reported that NIH had sent letters to MD Anderson identifying five cancer center researchers, all described by the center as Asian, who NIH said might have violated agency rules on maintaining the confidentiality of peer review or disclosing foreign ties. Three of the researchers subsequently left MD Anderson. The center said it had begun termination proceedings against a fourth. The results of the fifth investigation were released yesterday and first reported by the Houston Chronicle.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe NIH in Bethesda, Maryland, has said it has sent approximately 60 letters to institutions identifying specific grantees with potentially problematic foreign ties. MD Anderson, which worked closely with the Federal Bureau of Investigation on apparently related inquiries that preceded the NIH letters by at least 8 months, was the first institution publicly known to have disciplined researchers identified by NIH. Last week, Emory University in Atlanta said it had fired two researchers after inquiries from NIH; both are Chinese American. Other universities, including Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, have investigated possible violations but opted not to discipline faculty members.The developments have raised fears that U.S.-based researchers of Chinese ethnicity are being singled out for unfair scrutiny. In Houston, the “Asian American community has been filled with rumors, confusion, and anxiety since the beginning of 2018, well before MD Anderson received the NIH letters,” says engineer Steven Pei. He is part of a group of Chinese American community organizers who are preparing to take their concerns to a meeting with MD Anderson’s president, Peter Pisters, scheduled for June. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Researchers use DNA to take pictures of cells

first_imgA group of cells captured with a traditional optical microscope (left) and with DNA microscopy (right) Weinstein et al./Cell By Mitch LeslieJun. 20, 2019 , 11:00 AM Researchers use DNA to take pictures of cells Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe To look at a cell, you used to need a microscope. Now, researchers have found a way to view cells by using their own genetic material to take snapshots. The technique—called DNA microscopy—produces images that are less clear than those from traditional microscopy, but that could enable scientists to improve cancer treatment and probe how our nervous system forms.“DNA microscopy is an ingenious approach,” says geneticist Howard Chang of the Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, who wasn’t connected to the research. “I think it will be used.”To make the DNA microscope, postdoc Joshua Weinstein of the Broad Institute of in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and colleagues started with a group of cells in a culture dish. By creating DNA versions of the RNA molecules in the cells, they produced a large number of DNA molecules they could track. They then added tags—short pieces of DNA—that latched onto these DNA duplicates. Next, the scientists mixed in chemicals that produce multiple copies of these tags and the DNA molecules they connect to. As these copies built up, they started to drift away from their original location. When two wandering DNA molecules ran into each other, they linked up and spawned a unique DNA label that marked the encounter. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country These labels are crucial for capturing a DNA image of the cells. If two DNA molecules start out close to each other, their diffusing copies will hook up frequently and produce more labels than two DNA molecules that start out farther apart. To count the labels, the researchers grind up the cells and analyze the DNA they contain. A computer algorithm can then infer the original positions of the DNA molecules to generate an image.In a sense, Weinstein says, the original DNA molecules are like radio towers that send messages in the form of DNA molecules to each other. Researchers can detect when one tower communicates with another one nearby and use the pattern of transmissions among towers to map their locations.To determine how well the technique works, the researchers tested it on cells carrying genes for either green or red proteins. The image created with DNA microscopy was not as sharp as one the researchers obtained with a light microscope, but it distinguished the genetically distinct red and green cells, the team reports today in Cell. In addition, Weinstein says, it captured the arrangement of the cells. That ability could be useful in analyzing a sample from, say, an organ in a human body. The technique can’t yet reveal fine details within cells, however.“The goal is not to replace optical microscopy,” Weinstein says. But DNA microscopy can do some things optical microscopy can’t. For instance, optical microscopy often can’t distinguish among cells with DNA differences, such as tumor cells with specific mutations or immune cells, which are often genetically unique after shuffling their DNA. Weinstein says DNA microscopy may help improve certain cancer treatments by identifying immune cells that can attack tumors. As our nervous system develops, cells often produce unique RNAs that enable them to make specialized proteins, and the technique could also help researchers investigate these cells.The technique is “pretty cool,” says molecular technologist Joakim Lundeberg of the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, who helped develop an approach for visualizing RNA in cells. But he cautions that the study is preliminary and that researchers still need to determine the technique’s capabilities. DNA microscopy would be valuable if it could produce 3D images of cells in a sample, he says. “They need to demonstrate this in a tissue to really understand how useful it is.”last_img read more